College Athletes Finally Getting Paid?

Morgan S.

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California has now passed a law that could give N.C.A.A. athletes the ability to get paid. What this means is that college athletes would have the ability to get in touch with agents and make money off of endorsements they receive. Even though the bill has been signed it would not go into effect until 2023.

In the past, the N.C.A.A. rules were that college athletes should earn a degree and not money from participating in sports. College sports produced around 14 million dollars last year and not a dime went to the players. This new bill would allow athletes to promote companies and products. Governor Gavin Newsom said in an interview that, “Every single student in the university can market their name, image and likeness; they can go and get a YouTube channel, and they can monetize that,” Newsom said. “The only group that can’t are athletes. Why is that?”

There has been a lot of buzz and a lot of backlash about the potential for college athletes to get paid. The Pacific-12 athletic conference said that the law would “lead to the professionalization of college sports and many unintended consequences.” The Pac-12 conference includes 4 of California’s major colleges.

For example, Katelyn Ohashi is an incredible standout gymnast at the college level. When her perfect 10 floor routine went viral she could have made money off of her exceptional performance, but instead, she earned nothing. The college athletic establishment says that giving money to athletes would reduce the amount of money the school brings in, but if you look at the facts this is completely false. Like I said before the college sports made 14 million dollars last year because of their PLAYERS performance but for some reason, only the Universities and coaches are being paid. Some of the very top Universities made a total of 200 million dollars in 2017-18. Also, 62 college head coaches were paid 2 million dollars or more because of their athlete’s success. Shouldn’t college athletes be rewarded just like their coaches?

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For more information you can visit nytimes.com or https://www.latimes.com/opinion/story/2019-10-13/ncaa-pac-12-pay-student-athletes-california-law

 

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